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Questões de inglês - IME

Questão 21
2019InglêsÚnico

(IME 2019 - 2º fase) Texto 1 FROM FILM STAR TO FREQUENCY-HOPPING INVENTOR           I’m guessing that some younger readers _____21_____ who Hedy Lamarr was. Old-timers remember her as a popular Hollywood star of the mid-20th century. Characterized by MGM studio mogul Louis B. Mayer as “the most beautiful girl in the world,” a title said to originally have been bestowed by stage director Max Reinhardt, she appeared in some 25 Hollywood films between 1938 and 1958.           _____22____ her fans and many of her Hollywood colleagues was her creative side. They were unaware that ____23_____ the cameras were not rolling, Ms. Lamarr might be at home at her drawing board, diligently working at some concept that might lead to a commercial product or a patentable invention.           _____24____ an admirer of Hedy Lamarr the movie star (I particularly remember her in “Ziegfeld Girl,” costarring James Stewart, Judy Garland, Lana Turner, and Tony Martin, and “H. M. Pulham, Esq.,” with Robert Young and Van Heflen), I too was unaware of her innovative proclivities until 1984, when historian of cryptology David Kahn authored an article in IEEE Spectrum. It revealed to the uninitiated the existence of a 1941 patent _____25____ to Lamarr and her co-inventor, George Antheil, based on frequency-hopping and titled “Secret Communication System.” World War II ____26_____ in Europe, and Hedy, a native Austrian, left her munitions magnate husband Friedrich Mandl and relocated to the United States in 1937. As Hitler moved relentlessly in his attempt to conquer most of northern Europe, she was appalled by the German U-boat sinking of the SS City of Benarus. (…). She considered quitting the movie business and offering her services to the newly organized National Inventors Council (NIC), _____27____ to evaluate technology that could be useful in wartime, and chaired by inventor Charles Kettering. She did ____28_____, however.           In Hollywood, Hedy had met George Antheil, not an engineer but a composer with “a fair grasp of electronics,” as historian Kahn expressed it. Antheil joined her in her attempt to devise a jamproof guidance system for Allied torpedoes. A year before Pearl Harbor, she told Antheil she knew “a good deal about new munitions and various secret weapons,” presumably knowledge acquired while she was privy to discussions between Mandl and his munitions agents.           While not on the movie set, Lamarr would work with Antheil in her apartment to move her idea from concept to a practical system. In her early working documents a reference is made to the 116RX, the 1939 Philco radio console that featured the first wireless remote control (termed the Mystery Control and offering the listener options to select up to eight stations, a volume control, and an off switch). This ____29_____ just one among several inputs that inspired her to ____30_____ the idea she called “hopping of frequencies” (...) CHRISTIANSEN, D. Adaptado de From Film Star to Frequency-Hopping Inventor. In: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 15/06/2018. PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 21 A 30, ESCOLHA A ALTERNATIVA QUE COMPLETA O TEXTO 1 CORRETAMENTE. Lacuna (21)

Questão 22
2019InglêsÚnico

(IME 2019 - 2º fase) Texto 1 FROM FILM STAR TO FREQUENCY-HOPPING INVENTOR           I’m guessing that some younger readers _____21_____ who Hedy Lamarr was. Old-timers remember her as a popular Hollywood star of the mid-20th century. Characterized by MGM studio mogul Louis B. Mayer as “the most beautiful girl in the world,” a title said to originally have been bestowed by stage director Max Reinhardt, she appeared in some 25 Hollywood films between 1938 and 1958.           _____22____ her fans and many of her Hollywood colleagues was her creative side. They were unaware that ____23_____ the cameras were not rolling, Ms. Lamarr might be at home at her drawing board, diligently working at some concept that might lead to a commercial product or a patentable invention.           _____24____ an admirer of Hedy Lamarr the movie star (I particularly remember her in “Ziegfeld Girl,” costarring James Stewart, Judy Garland, Lana Turner, and Tony Martin, and “H. M. Pulham, Esq.,” with Robert Young and Van Heflen), I too was unaware of her innovative proclivities until 1984, when historian of cryptology David Kahn authored an article in IEEE Spectrum. It revealed to the uninitiated the existence of a 1941 patent _____25____ to Lamarr and her co-inventor, George Antheil, based on frequency-hopping and titled “Secret Communication System.” World War II ____26_____ in Europe, and Hedy, a native Austrian, left her munitions magnate husband Friedrich Mandl and relocated to the United States in 1937. As Hitler moved relentlessly in his attempt to conquer most of northern Europe, she was appalled by the German U-boat sinking of the SS City of Benarus. (…). She considered quitting the movie business and offering her services to the newly organized National Inventors Council (NIC), _____27____ to evaluate technology that could be useful in wartime, and chaired by inventor Charles Kettering. She did ____28_____, however.           In Hollywood, Hedy had met George Antheil, not an engineer but a composer with “a fair grasp of electronics,” as historian Kahn expressed it. Antheil joined her in her attempt to devise a jamproof guidance system for Allied torpedoes. A year before Pearl Harbor, she told Antheil she knew “a good deal about new munitions and various secret weapons,” presumably knowledge acquired while she was privy to discussions between Mandl and his munitions agents.           While not on the movie set, Lamarr would work with Antheil in her apartment to move her idea from concept to a practical system. In her early working documents a reference is made to the 116RX, the 1939 Philco radio console that featured the first wireless remote control (termed the Mystery Control and offering the listener options to select up to eight stations, a volume control, and an off switch). This ____29_____ just one among several inputs that inspired her to ____30_____ the idea she called “hopping of frequencies” (...) CHRISTIANSEN, D. Adaptado de From Film Star to Frequency-Hopping Inventor. In: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 15/06/2018. PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 21 A 30, ESCOLHA A ALTERNATIVA QUE COMPLETA O TEXTO 1 CORRETAMENTE. Lacuna 22.

Questão 23
2019InglêsÚnico

(IME 2019 - 2º fase) Texto 1 FROM FILM STAR TO FREQUENCY-HOPPING INVENTOR I’m guessing that some younger readers _____21_____ who Hedy Lamarr was. Old-timers remember her as a popular Hollywood star of the mid-20th century. Characterized by MGM studio mogul Louis B. Mayer as “the most beautiful girl in the world,” a title said to originally have been bestowed by stage director Max Reinhardt, she appeared in some 25 Hollywood films between 1938 and 1958. _____22____ her fans and many of her Hollywood colleagues was her creative side. They were unaware that ____23_____ the cameras were not rolling, Ms. Lamarr might be at home at her drawing board, diligently working at some concept that might lead to a commercial product or a patentable invention. _____24____ an admirer of Hedy Lamarr the movie star (I particularly remember her in “Ziegfeld Girl,” costarring James Stewart, Judy Garland, Lana Turner, and Tony Martin, and “H. M. Pulham, Esq.,” with Robert Young and Van Heflen), I too was unaware of her innovative proclivities until 1984, when historian of cryptology David Kahn authored an article in IEEE Spectrum. It revealed to the uninitiated the existence of a 1941 patent _____25____ to Lamarr and her co-inventor, George Antheil, based on frequency-hopping and titled “Secret Communication System.” World War II ____26_____ in Europe, and Hedy, a native Austrian, left her munitions magnate husband Friedrich Mandl and relocated to the United States in 1937. As Hitler moved relentlessly in his attempt to conquer most of northern Europe, she was appalled by the German U-boat sinking of the SS City of Benarus. (…). She considered quitting the movie business and offering her services to the newly organized National Inventors Council (NIC), _____27____ to evaluate technology that could be useful in wartime, and chaired by inventor Charles Kettering. She did ____28_____, however. In Hollywood, Hedy had met George Antheil, not an engineer but a composer with “a fair grasp of electronics,” as historian Kahn expressed it. Antheil joined her in her attempt to devise a jamproof guidance system for Allied torpedoes. A year before Pearl Harbor, she told Antheil she knew “a good deal about new munitions and various secret weapons,” presumably knowledge acquired while she was privy to discussions between Mandl and his munitions agents. While not on the movie set, Lamarr would work with Antheil in her apartment to move her idea from concept to a practical system. In her early working documents a reference is made to the 116RX, the 1939 Philco radio console that featured the first wireless remote control (termed the Mystery Control and offering the listener options to select up to eight stations, a volume control, and an off switch). This ____29_____ just one among several inputs that inspired her to ____30_____ the idea she called “hopping of frequencies” (...) CHRISTIANSEN, D. Adaptado de From Film Star to Frequency-Hopping Inventor. In: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 15/06/2018. PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 21 A 30, ESCOLHA A ALTERNATIVA QUE COMPLETA O TEXTO 1 CORRETAMENTE. Lacuna 23.

Questão 24
2019InglêsÚnico

(IME 2019 - 2º fase) Texto 1 FROM FILM STAR TO FREQUENCY-HOPPING INVENTOR           I’m guessing that some younger readers _____21_____ who Hedy Lamarr was. Old-timers remember her as a popular Hollywood star of the mid-20th century. Characterized by MGM studio mogul Louis B. Mayer as “the most beautiful girl in the world,” a title said to originally have been bestowed by stage director Max Reinhardt, she appeared in some 25 Hollywood films between 1938 and 1958.           _____22____ her fans and many of her Hollywood colleagues was her creative side. They were unaware that ____23_____ the cameras were not rolling, Ms. Lamarr might be at home at her drawing board, diligently working at some concept that might lead to a commercial product or a patentable invention.           _____24____ an admirer of Hedy Lamarr the movie star (I particularly remember her in “Ziegfeld Girl,” costarring James Stewart, Judy Garland, Lana Turner, and Tony Martin, and “H. M. Pulham, Esq.,” with Robert Young and Van Heflen), I too was unaware of her innovative proclivities until 1984, when historian of cryptology David Kahn authored an article in IEEE Spectrum. It revealed to the uninitiated the existence of a 1941 patent _____25____ to Lamarr and her co-inventor, George Antheil, based on frequency-hopping and titled “Secret Communication System.” World War II ____26_____ in Europe, and Hedy, a native Austrian, left her munitions magnate husband Friedrich Mandl and relocated to the United States in 1937. As Hitler moved relentlessly in his attempt to conquer most of northern Europe, she was appalled by the German U-boat sinking of the SS City of Benarus. (…). She considered quitting the movie business and offering her services to the newly organized National Inventors Council (NIC), _____27____ to evaluate technology that could be useful in wartime, and chaired by inventor Charles Kettering. She did ____28_____, however.           In Hollywood, Hedy had met George Antheil, not an engineer but a composer with “a fair grasp of electronics,” as historian Kahn expressed it. Antheil joined her in her attempt to devise a jamproof guidance system for Allied torpedoes. A year before Pearl Harbor, she told Antheil she knew “a good deal about new munitions and various secret weapons,” presumably knowledge acquired while she was privy to discussions between Mandl and his munitions agents.           While not on the movie set, Lamarr would work with Antheil in her apartment to move her idea from concept to a practical system. In her early working documents a reference is made to the 116RX, the 1939 Philco radio console that featured the first wireless remote control (termed the Mystery Control and offering the listener options to select up to eight stations, a volume control, and an off switch). This ____29_____ just one among several inputs that inspired her to ____30_____ the idea she called “hopping of frequencies” (...) CHRISTIANSEN, D. Adaptado de From Film Star to Frequency-Hopping Inventor. In: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 15/06/2018. PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 21 A 30, ESCOLHA A ALTERNATIVA QUE COMPLETA O TEXTO 1 CORRETAMENTE. Lacuna 24.

Questão 25
2019InglêsÚnico

(IME 2019 - 2º fase)   Texto 1 FROM FILM STAR TO FREQUENCY-HOPPING INVENTOR         I’m guessing that some younger readers _____21_____ who Hedy Lamarr was. Old-timers remember her as a popular Hollywood star of the mid-20th century. Characterized by MGM studio mogul Louis B. Mayer as “the most beautiful girl in the world,” a title said to originally have been bestowed by stage director Max Reinhardt, she appeared in some 25 Hollywood films between 1938 and 1958.         _____22____ her fans and many of her Hollywood colleagues was her creative side. They were unaware that ____23_____ the cameras were not rolling, Ms. Lamarr might be at home at her drawing board, diligently working at some concept that might lead to a commercial product or a patentable invention.         _____24____ an admirer of Hedy Lamarr the movie star (I particularly remember her in “Ziegfeld Girl,” costarring James Stewart, Judy Garland, Lana Turner, and Tony Martin, and “H. M. Pulham, Esq.,” with Robert Young and Van Heflen), I too was unaware of her innovative proclivities until 1984, when historian of cryptology David Kahn authored an article in IEEE Spectrum. It revealed to the uninitiated the existence of a 1941 patent _____25____ to Lamarr and her co-inventor, George Antheil, based on frequency-hopping and titled “Secret Communication System.” World War II ____26_____ in Europe, and Hedy, a native Austrian, left her munitions magnate husband Friedrich Mandl and relocated to the United States in 1937. As Hitler moved relentlessly in his attempt to conquer most of northern Europe, she was appalled by the German U-boat sinking of the SS City of Benarus. (…). She considered quitting the movie business and offering her services to the newly organized National Inventors Council (NIC), _____27____ to evaluate technology that could be useful in wartime, and chaired by inventor Charles Kettering. She did ____28_____, however.         In Hollywood, Hedy had met George Antheil, not an engineer but a composer with “a fair grasp of electronics,” as historian Kahn expressed it. Antheil joined her in her attempt to devise a jamproof guidance system for Allied torpedoes. A year before Pearl Harbor, she told Antheil she knew “a good deal about new munitions and various secret weapons,” presumably knowledge acquired while she was privy to discussions between Mandl and his munitions agents.         While not on the movie set, Lamarr would work with Antheil in her apartment to move her idea from concept to a practical system. In her early working documents a reference is made to the 116RX, the 1939 Philco radio console that featured the first wireless remote control (termed the Mystery Control and offering the listener options to select up to eight stations, a volume control, and an off switch). This ____29_____ just one among several inputs that inspired her to ____30_____ the idea she called “hopping of frequencies” (...) CHRISTIANSEN, D. Adaptado de From Film Star to Frequency-Hopping Inventor. In: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 15/06/2018. PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 21 A 30, ESCOLHA A ALTERNATIVA QUE COMPLETA O TEXTO 1 CORRETAMENTE. Lacuna 25.

Questão 26
2019InglêsÚnica

(IME 2019 - 2º fase) Texto 1 FROM FILM STAR TO FREQUENCY-HOPPING INVENTOR         I’m guessing that some younger readers _____21_____ who Hedy Lamarr was. Old-timers remember her as a popular Hollywood star of the mid-20th century. Characterized by MGM studio mogul Louis B. Mayer as “the most beautiful girl in the world,” a title said to originally have been bestowed by stage director Max Reinhardt, she appeared in some 25 Hollywood films between 1938 and 1958.         _____22____ her fans and many of her Hollywood colleagues was her creative side. They were unaware that ____23_____ the cameras were not rolling, Ms. Lamarr might be at home at her drawing board, diligently working at some concept that might lead to a commercial product or a patentable invention.         _____24____ an admirer of Hedy Lamarr the movie star (I particularly remember her in “Ziegfeld Girl,” costarring James Stewart, Judy Garland, Lana Turner, and Tony Martin, and “H. M. Pulham, Esq.,” with Robert Young and Van Heflen), I too was unaware of her innovative proclivities until 1984, when historian of cryptology David Kahn authored an article in IEEE Spectrum. It revealed to the uninitiated the existence of a 1941 patent _____25____ to Lamarr and her co-inventor, George Antheil, based on frequency-hopping and titled “Secret Communication System.” World War II ____26_____ in Europe, and Hedy, a native Austrian, left her munitions magnate husband Friedrich Mandl and relocated to the United States in 1937. As Hitler moved relentlessly in his attempt to conquer most of northern Europe, she was appalled by the German U-boat sinking of the SS City of Benarus. (…). She considered quitting the movie business and offering her services to the newly organized National Inventors Council (NIC), _____27____ to evaluate technology that could be useful in wartime, and chaired by inventor Charles Kettering. She did ____28_____, however.         In Hollywood, Hedy had met George Antheil, not an engineer but a composer with “a fair grasp of electronics,” as historian Kahn expressed it. Antheil joined her in her attempt to devise a jamproof guidance system for Allied torpedoes. A year before Pearl Harbor, she told Antheil she knew “a good deal about new munitions and various secret weapons,” presumably knowledge acquired while she was privy to discussions between Mandl and his munitions agents.         While not on the movie set, Lamarr would work with Antheil in her apartment to move her idea from concept to a practical system. In her early working documents a reference is made to the 116RX, the 1939 Philco radio console that featured the first wireless remote control (termed the Mystery Control and offering the listener options to select up to eight stations, a volume control, and an off switch). This ____29_____ just one among several inputs that inspired her to ____30_____ the idea she called “hopping of frequencies” (...) CHRISTIANSEN, D. Adaptado de From Film Star to Frequency-Hopping Inventor. In: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 15/06/2018. PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 21 A 30, ESCOLHA A ALTERNATIVA QUE COMPLETA O TEXTO 1 CORRETAMENTE. Lacuna 26.

Questão 27
2019InglêsÚnico

(IME 2019 - 2º fase) Texto 1 FROM FILM STAR TO FREQUENCY-HOPPING INVENTOR           I’m guessing that some younger readers _____21_____ who Hedy Lamarr was. Old-timers remember her as a popular Hollywood star of the mid-20th century. Characterized by MGM studio mogul Louis B. Mayer as “the most beautiful girl in the world,” a title said to originally have been bestowed by stage director Max Reinhardt, she appeared in some 25 Hollywood films between 1938 and 1958.           _____22____ her fans and many of her Hollywood colleagues was her creative side. They were unaware that ____23_____ the cameras were not rolling, Ms. Lamarr might be at home at her drawing board, diligently working at some concept that might lead to a commercial product or a patentable invention.           _____24____ an admirer of Hedy Lamarr the movie star (I particularly remember her in “Ziegfeld Girl,” costarring James Stewart, Judy Garland, Lana Turner, and Tony Martin, and “H. M. Pulham, Esq.,” with Robert Young and Van Heflen), I too was unaware of her innovative proclivities until 1984, when historian of cryptology David Kahn authored an article in IEEE Spectrum. It revealed to the uninitiated the existence of a 1941 patent _____25____ to Lamarr and her co-inventor, George Antheil, based on frequency-hopping and titled “Secret Communication System.” World War II ____26_____ in Europe, and Hedy, a native Austrian, left her munitions magnate husband Friedrich Mandl and relocated to the United States in 1937. As Hitler moved relentlessly in his attempt to conquer most of northern Europe, she was appalled by the German U-boat sinking of the SS City of Benarus. (…). She considered quitting the movie business and offering her services to the newly organized National Inventors Council (NIC), _____27____ to evaluate technology that could be useful in wartime, and chaired by inventor Charles Kettering. She did ____28_____, however.           In Hollywood, Hedy had met George Antheil, not an engineer but a composer with “a fair grasp of electronics,” as historian Kahn expressed it. Antheil joined her in her attempt to devise a jamproof guidance system for Allied torpedoes. A year before Pearl Harbor, she told Antheil she knew “a good deal about new munitions and various secret weapons,” presumably knowledge acquired while she was privy to discussions between Mandl and his munitions agents.           While not on the movie set, Lamarr would work with Antheil in her apartment to move her idea from concept to a practical system. In her early working documents a reference is made to the 116RX, the 1939 Philco radio console that featured the first wireless remote control (termed the Mystery Control and offering the listener options to select up to eight stations, a volume control, and an off switch). This ____29_____ just one among several inputs that inspired her to ____30_____ the idea she called “hopping of frequencies” (...) CHRISTIANSEN, D. Adaptado de From Film Star to Frequency-Hopping Inventor. In: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 15/06/2018. PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 21 A 30, ESCOLHA A ALTERNATIVA QUE COMPLETA O TEXTO 1 CORRETAMENTE. Lacuna 27.

Questão 28
2019InglêsÚnico

(IME 2019 - 2º fase) Texto 1 FROM FILM STAR TO FREQUENCY-HOPPING INVENTOR           I’m guessing that some younger readers _____21_____ who Hedy Lamarr was. Old-timers remember her as a popular Hollywood star of the mid-20th century. Characterized by MGM studio mogul Louis B. Mayer as “the most beautiful girl in the world,” a title said to originally have been bestowed by stage director Max Reinhardt, she appeared in some 25 Hollywood films between 1938 and 1958.           _____22____ her fans and many of her Hollywood colleagues was her creative side. They were unaware that ____23_____ the cameras were not rolling, Ms. Lamarr might be at home at her drawing board, diligently working at some concept that might lead to a commercial product or a patentable invention.           _____24____ an admirer of Hedy Lamarr the movie star (I particularly remember her in “Ziegfeld Girl,” costarring James Stewart, Judy Garland, Lana Turner, and Tony Martin, and “H. M. Pulham, Esq.,” with Robert Young and Van Heflen), I too was unaware of her innovative proclivities until 1984, when historian of cryptology David Kahn authored an article in IEEE Spectrum. It revealed to the uninitiated the existence of a 1941 patent _____25____ to Lamarr and her co-inventor, George Antheil, based on frequency-hopping and titled “Secret Communication System.” World War II ____26_____ in Europe, and Hedy, a native Austrian, left her munitions magnate husband Friedrich Mandl and relocated to the United States in 1937. As Hitler moved relentlessly in his attempt to conquer most of northern Europe, she was appalled by the German U-boat sinking of the SS City of Benarus. (…). She considered quitting the movie business and offering her services to the newly organized National Inventors Council (NIC), _____27____ to evaluate technology that could be useful in wartime, and chaired by inventor Charles Kettering. She did ____28_____, however.           In Hollywood, Hedy had met George Antheil, not an engineer but a composer with “a fair grasp of electronics,” as historian Kahn expressed it. Antheil joined her in her attempt to devise a jamproof guidance system for Allied torpedoes. A year before Pearl Harbor, she told Antheil she knew “a good deal about new munitions and various secret weapons,” presumably knowledge acquired while she was privy to discussions between Mandl and his munitions agents.           While not on the movie set, Lamarr would work with Antheil in her apartment to move her idea from concept to a practical system. In her early working documents a reference is made to the 116RX, the 1939 Philco radio console that featured the first wireless remote control (termed the Mystery Control and offering the listener options to select up to eight stations, a volume control, and an off switch). This ____29_____ just one among several inputs that inspired her to ____30_____ the idea she called “hopping of frequencies” (...) CHRISTIANSEN, D. Adaptado de From Film Star to Frequency-Hopping Inventor. In: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 15/06/2018. PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 21 A 30, ESCOLHA A ALTERNATIVA QUE COMPLETA O TEXTO 1 CORRETAMENTE. Lacuna 28.

Questão 29
2019InglêsÚnico

(IME 2019 - 2º fase) Texto 1 FROM FILM STAR TO FREQUENCY-HOPPING INVENTOR           I’m guessing that some younger readers _____21_____ who Hedy Lamarr was. Old-timers remember her as a popular Hollywood star of the mid-20th century. Characterized by MGM studio mogul Louis B. Mayer as “the most beautiful girl in the world,” a title said to originally have been bestowed by stage director Max Reinhardt, she appeared in some 25 Hollywood films between 1938 and 1958.           _____22____ her fans and many of her Hollywood colleagues was her creative side. They were unaware that ____23_____ the cameras were not rolling, Ms. Lamarr might be at home at her drawing board, diligently working at some concept that might lead to a commercial product or a patentable invention.           _____24____ an admirer of Hedy Lamarr the movie star (I particularly remember her in “Ziegfeld Girl,” costarring James Stewart, Judy Garland, Lana Turner, and Tony Martin, and “H. M. Pulham, Esq.,” with Robert Young and Van Heflen), I too was unaware of her innovative proclivities until 1984, when historian of cryptology David Kahn authored an article in IEEE Spectrum. It revealed to the uninitiated the existence of a 1941 patent _____25____ to Lamarr and her co-inventor, George Antheil, based on frequency-hopping and titled “Secret Communication System.” World War II ____26_____ in Europe, and Hedy, a native Austrian, left her munitions magnate husband Friedrich Mandl and relocated to the United States in 1937. As Hitler moved relentlessly in his attempt to conquer most of northern Europe, she was appalled by the German U-boat sinking of the SS City of Benarus. (…). She considered quitting the movie business and offering her services to the newly organized National Inventors Council (NIC), _____27____ to evaluate technology that could be useful in wartime, and chaired by inventor Charles Kettering. She did ____28_____, however.           In Hollywood, Hedy had met George Antheil, not an engineer but a composer with “a fair grasp of electronics,” as historian Kahn expressed it. Antheil joined her in her attempt to devise a jamproof guidance system for Allied torpedoes. A year before Pearl Harbor, she told Antheil she knew “a good deal about new munitions and various secret weapons,” presumably knowledge acquired while she was privy to discussions between Mandl and his munitions agents.           While not on the movie set, Lamarr would work with Antheil in her apartment to move her idea from concept to a practical system. In her early working documents a reference is made to the 116RX, the 1939 Philco radio console that featured the first wireless remote control (termed the Mystery Control and offering the listener options to select up to eight stations, a volume control, and an off switch). This ____29_____ just one among several inputs that inspired her to ____30_____ the idea she called “hopping of frequencies” (...) CHRISTIANSEN, D. Adaptado de From Film Star to Frequency-Hopping Inventor. In: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 15/06/2018. PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 21 A 30, ESCOLHA A ALTERNATIVA QUE COMPLETA O TEXTO 1 CORRETAMENTE. Lacuna 29.

Questão 30
2019InglêsÚnico

(IME 2019 - 2º fase) Texto 1 FROM FILM STAR TO FREQUENCY-HOPPING INVENTOR           I’m guessing that some younger readers _____21_____ who Hedy Lamarr was. Old-timers remember her as a popular Hollywood star of the mid-20th century. Characterized by MGM studio mogul Louis B. Mayer as “the most beautiful girl in the world,” a title said to originally have been bestowed by stage director Max Reinhardt, she appeared in some 25 Hollywood films between 1938 and 1958.           _____22____ her fans and many of her Hollywood colleagues was her creative side. They were unaware that ____23_____ the cameras were not rolling, Ms. Lamarr might be at home at her drawing board, diligently working at some concept that might lead to a commercial product or a patentable invention.           _____24____ an admirer of Hedy Lamarr the movie star (I particularly remember her in “Ziegfeld Girl,” costarring James Stewart, Judy Garland, Lana Turner, and Tony Martin, and “H. M. Pulham, Esq.,” with Robert Young and Van Heflen), I too was unaware of her innovative proclivities until 1984, when historian of cryptology David Kahn authored an article in IEEE Spectrum. It revealed to the uninitiated the existence of a 1941 patent _____25____ to Lamarr and her co-inventor, George Antheil, based on frequency-hopping and titled “Secret Communication System.” World War II ____26_____ in Europe, and Hedy, a native Austrian, left her munitions magnate husband Friedrich Mandl and relocated to the United States in 1937. As Hitler moved relentlessly in his attempt to conquer most of northern Europe, she was appalled by the German U-boat sinking of the SS City of Benarus. (…). She considered quitting the movie business and offering her services to the newly organized National Inventors Council (NIC), _____27____ to evaluate technology that could be useful in wartime, and chaired by inventor Charles Kettering. She did ____28_____, however.           In Hollywood, Hedy had met George Antheil, not an engineer but a composer with “a fair grasp of electronics,” as historian Kahn expressed it. Antheil joined her in her attempt to devise a jamproof guidance system for Allied torpedoes. A year before Pearl Harbor, she told Antheil she knew “a good deal about new munitions and various secret weapons,” presumably knowledge acquired while she was privy to discussions between Mandl and his munitions agents.           While not on the movie set, Lamarr would work with Antheil in her apartment to move her idea from concept to a practical system. In her early working documents a reference is made to the 116RX, the 1939 Philco radio console that featured the first wireless remote control (termed the Mystery Control and offering the listener options to select up to eight stations, a volume control, and an off switch). This ____29_____ just one among several inputs that inspired her to ____30_____ the idea she called “hopping of frequencies” (...) CHRISTIANSEN, D. Adaptado de From Film Star to Frequency-Hopping Inventor. In: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 15/06/2018. PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 21 A 30, ESCOLHA A ALTERNATIVA QUE COMPLETA O TEXTO 1 CORRETAMENTE. Lacuna 30.

Questão 31
2019InglêsÚnico

PARA AS QUESTÕES 31 A 33, RESPONDA DE ACORDO COM O TEXTO 2 A SEGUIR. Texto 2 CORPORATE CONTROL AND GLOBAL GOVERNANCE OF MARINE GENETIC RESOURCES INTRODUCTION The prospect of the ocean generating a new era of “blue growth” is increasingly finding its way into national and international policy documents around the world and has spurred a rush to claim ocean space and resources. If economic activities in coastal and offshore areas are to expand in an equitable and sustainable manner, in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), progress is needed toward addressing multiple and potentially conflicting uses of ocean space within national jurisdictions, in addition to developing a consistent and transparent legal framework for the vast areas beyond national  jurisdiction (ABNJ). These areas cover 64% of the world’s ocean and 47% of the Earth’s surface yet remain poorly understood or described. Marine organisms have evolved to thrive in the extremes of pressure, temperature, chemistry, and darkness found in the ocean, resulting in unique adaptations that make them the object of commercial interest, particularly for biomedical and industrial applications. By 2025, the global market for marine biotechnology is projected to reach $6.4 billion, spanning a broad range of commercial purposes for the pharmaceutical, biofuel, and chemical industries. One way to ensure exclusive access to these potential economic benefits is through patents associated with “marine genetic resources” (MGRs). Although the term MGRs has never been formally described, it suggests a subset of “genetic resources”, which have been defined under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) as “genetic material of actual or potential value”.____________________. The adoption of the Nagoya Protocol in 2010 represented an important step within the international policy arena to define obligations associated with monetary and nonmonetary benefit sharing of genetic resources and their products sourced from within national jurisdictions. No such mechanism currently exists for ABNJ.  ( . . . ) BLASIAK, R.; JOUFFRAY, JB.; WABNITZ, C.; SUNDSTROM, E. e OSTERBLOM, H. Adaptado de Corporate control and global governance of marine genetic resources. In: Science Advances. Disponível em <http://advances.sciencemag.org/ content/4/6/eaar5237.full>. Acesso em: 07/08/2018.   (IME 2019 - 2ª Fase) Choose the correct option.

Questão 32
2019InglêsÙnico

PARA AS QUESTÕES 31 A 33, RESPONDA DE ACORDO COM O TEXTO 2 A SEGUIR. Texto 2 CORPORATE CONTROL AND GLOBAL GOVERNANCE OF MARINE GENETIC RESOURCES INTRODUCTION The prospect of the ocean generating a new era of “blue growth” is increasingly finding its way into national and international policy documents around the world and has spurred a rush to claim ocean space and resources. If economic activities in coastal and offshore areas are to expand in an equitable and sustainable manner, in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), progress is needed toward addressing multiple and potentially conflicting uses of ocean space within national jurisdictions, in addition to developing a consistent and transparent legal framework for the vast areas beyond national  jurisdiction (ABNJ). These areas cover 64% of the world’s ocean and 47% of the Earth’s surface yet remain poorly understood or described. Marine organisms have evolved to thrive in the extremes of pressure, temperature, chemistry, and darkness found in the ocean, resulting in unique adaptations that make them the object of commercial interest, particularly for biomedical and industrial applications. By 2025, the global market for marine biotechnology is projected to reach $6.4 billion, spanning a broad range of commercial purposes for the pharmaceutical, biofuel, and chemical industries. One way to ensure exclusive access to these potential economic benefits is through patents associated with “marine genetic resources” (MGRs). Although the term MGRs has never been formally described, it suggests a subset of “genetic resources”, which have been defined under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) as “genetic material of actual or potential value”.____________________. The adoption of the Nagoya Protocol in 2010 represented an important step within the international policy arena to define obligations associated with monetary and nonmonetary benefit sharing of genetic resources and their products sourced from within national jurisdictions. No such mechanism currently exists for ABNJ.  ( . . . ) BLASIAK, R.; JOUFFRAY, JB.; WABNITZ, C.; SUNDSTROM, E. e OSTERBLOM, H. Adaptado de Corporate control and global governance of marine genetic resources. In: Science Advances. Disponível em <http://advances.sciencemag.org/ content/4/6/eaar5237.full>. Acesso em: 07/08/2018. (IME 2019 - 2ª Fase) Choose the correct option:

Questão 33
2019InglêsÚnico

PARA AS QUESTÕES 31 A 33, RESPONDA DE ACORDO COM O TEXTO 2 A SEGUIR. Texto 2 CORPORATE CONTROL AND GLOBAL GOVERNANCE OF MARINE GENETIC RESOURCES INTRODUCTION The prospect of the ocean generating a new era of “blue growth” is increasingly finding its way into national and international policy documents around the world and has spurred a rush to claim ocean space and resources. If economic activities in coastal and offshore areas are to expand in an equitable and sustainable manner, in line with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), progress is needed toward addressing multiple and potentially conflicting uses of ocean space within national jurisdictions, in addition to developing a consistent and transparent legal framework for the vast areas beyond national  jurisdiction (ABNJ). These areas cover 64% of the world’s ocean and 47% of the Earth’s surface yet remain poorly understood or described. Marine organisms have evolved to thrive in the extremes of pressure, temperature, chemistry, and darkness found in the ocean, resulting in unique adaptations that make them the object of commercial interest, particularly for biomedical and industrial applications. By 2025, the global market for marine biotechnology is projected to reach $6.4 billion, spanning a broad range of commercial purposes for the pharmaceutical, biofuel, and chemical industries. One way to ensure exclusive access to these potential economic benefits is through patents associated with “marine genetic resources” (MGRs). Although the term MGRs has never been formally described, it suggests a subset of “genetic resources”, which have been defined under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) as “genetic material of actual or potential value”.____________________. The adoption of the Nagoya Protocol in 2010 represented an important step within the international policy arena to define obligations associated with monetary and nonmonetary benefit sharing of genetic resources and their products sourced from within national jurisdictions. No such mechanism currently exists for ABNJ.  ( . . . ) BLASIAK, R.; JOUFFRAY, JB.; WABNITZ, C.; SUNDSTROM, E. e OSTERBLOM, H. Adaptado de Corporate contro and global governance of marine genetic resources. In: Science Advances. Disponível em <http://advances.sciencemag.org/ content/4/6/eaar5237.full>. Acesso em: 07/08/2018.   (IME 2019 - 2ª Fase) Choose the appropriate continuation for “Although the term MGRs has never been formally described, it suggests a subset of ‘genetic resources,’ which have been defined under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) as ‘genetic material of actual or potential value’.”

Questão 34
2019InglêsÚnico

PARA AS QUESTÕES 34 E 35, RESPONDA DE ACORDO COM O TEXTO 3 A SEGUIR. Texto 3 THE DISCOVERY OF PENICILLIN—NEW INSIGHTS AFTER MORE THAN 75 YEARS OF CLINICAL USE ABSTRACT After just over 75 years of penicillin’s clinical use, the world can see that its impact was immediate and profound. In 1928, a chance event in Alexander Fleming’s London laboratory changed the course of medicine. However, the purification and first  clinical use of penicillin would take more than a decade. Unprecedented United States/Great Britain cooperation to produce penicillin was incredibly successful by 1943. This success overshadowed efforts to produce penicillin during World War II in  Europe, particularly in the Netherlands. Information about these efforts, available only in the last 10–15 years, provides new insights into the story of the first antibiotic. Researchers in the Netherlands produced penicillin using their own production methods and marketed it in 1946, which eventually increased the penicillin supply and decreased the price. The unusual serendipity involved in the discovery of penicillin demonstrates the difficulties in finding new antibiotics and should remind health professionals to expertly manage these extraordinary medicines. ( . . . ) GAYNES, R. The Discovery of Penicillin—New Insights After More Than 75 Years of Clinical Use. In: Science, 2017. Disponível em: <http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/5/16-1556_article>. Acesso em: 26/06/2018. (IME 2019 - 2ª Fase) Choose the correct option.

Questão 35
2019InglêsÚnico

PARA AS QUESTÕES 34 E 35, RESPONDA DE ACORDO COM O TEXTO 3 A SEGUIR. Texto 3 THE DISCOVERY OF PENICILLIN—NEW INSIGHTS AFTER MORE THAN 75 YEARS OF CLINICAL USE ABSTRACT After just over 75 years of penicillin’s clinical use, the world can see that its impact was immediate and profound. In 1928, a chance event in Alexander Fleming’s London laboratory changed the course of medicine. However, the purification and first  clinical use of penicillin would take more than a decade. Unprecedented United States/Great Britain cooperation to produce penicillin was incredibly successful by 1943. This success overshadowed efforts to produce penicillin during World War II in  Europe, particularly in the Netherlands. Information about these efforts, available only in the last 10–15 years, provides new insights into the story of the first antibiotic. Researchers in the Netherlands produced penicillin using their own production methods and marketed it in 1946, which eventually increased the penicillin supply and decreased the price. The unusual serendipity involved in the discovery of penicillin demonstrates the difficulties in finding new antibiotics and should remind health professionals to expertly manage these extraordinary medicines. ( . . . ) GAYNES, R. The Discovery of Penicillin—New Insights After More Than 75 Years of Clinical Use. In: Science, 2017. Disponível em: <http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/23/5/16-1556_article>. Acesso em: 26/06/2018. (IME 2019 - 2ª Fase) Choose the correct option.The meaning of the word “serendipity” in the sentence: “The unusual serendipity involved in the discovery of penicillin demonstrates the difficulties in finding new antibiotics (...)” is: