Questões e gabarito - AFA 2020

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Questão 44
2020Inglês

(AFA - 2020) Music therapy with cancer patients Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, in Germany and in many other industrialized countries. In 2007, about 12 million people were diagnosed with cancer worldwide with a mortality rate of 7.6 million (American Cancer Society, 2007). In the industrial countries, the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men are prostate cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer. Women are most commonly diagnosed with breast cancer, gastric cancer and lung cancer. The symptoms of cancer depend on the type of the disease, but there are common symptoms caused by cancer and/or by its medical treatment (e.g., chemotherapy and radiation). Common physical symptoms are pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, loss of appetite, nausea (feeling sick, vomiting), dizziness, limited physical activity, hair loss, a sore mouth/throat and bowel problems. Cancer also often causes psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, mood disturbances, stress, insecurity, grief and decreased self-esteem. This, in turn, can implicate social consequences. Social isolation can occur due to physical or psychological symptoms (for example, feeling too tired to meet friends, cutting oneself off due to depressive complaints). Besides conventional pharmacological treatments of cancer, there are treatments to meet psychological and physical needs of the patient. Psychological consequences of cancer, such as depression, anxiety or loss of control, can be counteracted by psychotherapy. For example, within cognitive therapy cancer patients may develop coping strategies to handle the disease. Research indicates that music therapy, which is a form of psychotherapy, can have positive effects on both physiological and psychological symptoms of cancer patients as well as in acute or palliative situations. There are several definitions of music therapy. According to the World Federation of Music Therapy (WFMT, 1996), music therapy is: the use of music and/or its music elements (sound, rhythm, melody and harmony) by a qualified music therapist, with a client or group, in a process designed to facilitate and promote communication, relationship, learning, mobilization, expression, organization, and other relevant therapeutic objectives, in order to meet physical, emotional, mental, social and cognitive needs. The Dutch Music Therapy Association (NVCT, 1999) defines music therapy as a methodological form of assistance in which musical means are used within a therapeutic relation to manage changes, developments, stabilisation or acceptance on the emotional, behavioural, cognitive, social or on the physical field. The assumption is that the patients musical behaviour conforms to their general behaviour. The starting points are the features of the patients specific disorder or disease pattern. There is an analogy between psychological problems and musical behaviour, which means that emotions can be expressed musically. For patients who have difficulties in expressing emotions, music therapy can be a useful medium. Music therapy might be a useful intervention for breast cancer patients in order to facilitate and enhance their emotional expressivity. Besides analogy, there are further qualities of music that can be beneficial within therapeutic treatment. One of these qualities is symbolism: music can symbolize persons, objects, incidents, experiences or memories of daily life. Therefore, music is a reality, which represents another reality. The symbolism of the musical reality enables the patient to deal safely with the other reality for it evokes memories about persons, objects or incidents. These associations can be perceived as positive or negative, so they release emotions in the patient. Music therapy both addresses physical and psychological needs of the patient. Numerous studies indicate that music therapy can be beneficial to both acute cancer patients and palliative cancer patients in the final stage of disease. Most research with acute cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, surgery or stem cell transplantation examined the effectiveness of receptive music therapy. Listening to music during chemotherapy, either played live by the music therapist or from tape has a positive effect on pain perception, relaxation, anxiety and mood. There was also found a decrease in diastolic blood pressure or heart rate and an improvement in fatigue; insomnia and appetite loss could be significantly decreased in patients older than 45 years. Further improvements by receptive music therapy were found for physical comfort, vitality, dizziness and tolerability of the chemotherapy. A study with patients undergoing surgery found that receptive music therapy led to decreased anxiety, stress and relaxation levels before, during and after surgery. Music therapy can also be applied in palliative situations, for example to patients with terminal cancer who live in hospices. Studies indicate that music therapy may be beneficial for cancer patients in acute and palliative situations, but the benefits of music therapy for convalescing cancer patients remain unclear. Whereas music therapy interventions for acute and palliative patients often focus on physiological and psychosomatic symptoms, such as pain perception and reducing medical side-effects, music therapy with posthospital curative treatment could have its main focus on psychological aspects. A cancer patient is not free from cancer until five years after the tumour ablation. The patient fears that the cancer has not been defeated. In this stage of the disease, patients frequently feel insecure, depressive and are emotionally unstable. How to handle irksome and negative emotions is an important issue for many oncology patients. After the difficult period of the medical treatment, which they often have overcome in a prosaic way by masking emotions, patients often express the wish to become aware of themselves again. They may wish to grapple with negative emotions due to their disease. Other patients wish to experience positive feelings, such as enjoyment and vitality. The results indicate that music therapy can also have positive influences on well-being of cancer patients in the post-hospital curative stage as well as they offer valuable information about patients needs in this state of treatment and how effects can be dealt with properly. (Adapted fromhttps://essay.utwente.nl/59115/1/scriptie_F_Teiwes.pdf- Access on 25/02/19) According to the text, mark the option wich contains the meaning for the word hospice (paragraph 9, last line).

Questão 45
2020Inglês

(AFA - 2020) Music therapy with cancer patients Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, in Germany and in many other industrialized countries. In 2007, about 12 million people were diagnosed with cancer worldwide with a mortality rate of 7.6 million (American Cancer Society, 2007). In the industrial countries, the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men are prostate cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer. Women are most commonly diagnosed with breast cancer, gastric cancer and lung cancer. The symptoms of cancer depend on the type of the disease, but there are common symptoms caused by cancer and/or by its medical treatment (e.g., chemotherapy and radiation). Common physical symptoms are pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, loss of appetite, nausea (feeling sick, vomiting), dizziness, limited physical activity, hair loss, a sore mouth/throat and bowel problems. Cancer also often causes psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, mood disturbances, stress, insecurity, grief and decreased self-esteem. This, in turn, can implicate social consequences. Social isolation can occur due to physical or psychological symptoms (for example, feeling too tired to meet friends, cutting oneself off due to depressive complaints). Besides conventional pharmacological treatments of cancer, there are treatments to meet psychological and physical needs of the patient. Psychological consequences of cancer, such as depression, anxiety or loss of control, can be counteracted by psychotherapy. For example, within cognitive therapy cancer patients may develop coping strategies to handle the disease. Research indicates that music therapy, which is a form of psychotherapy, can have positive effects on both physiological and psychological symptoms of cancer patients as well as in acute or palliative situations. There are several definitions of music therapy. According to the World Federation of Music Therapy (WFMT, 1996), music therapy is: the use of music and/or its music elements (sound, rhythm, melody and harmony) by a qualified music therapist, with a client or group, in a process designed to facilitate and promote communication, relationship, learning, mobilization, expression, organization, and other relevant therapeutic objectives, in order to meet physical, emotional, mental, social and cognitive needs. The Dutch Music Therapy Association (NVCT, 1999) defines music therapy as a methodological form of assistance in which musical means are used within a therapeutic relation to manage changes, developments, stabilisation or acceptance on the emotional, behavioural, cognitive, social or on the physical field. The assumption is that the patients musical behaviour conforms to their general behaviour. The starting points are the features of the patients specific disorder or disease pattern. There is an analogy between psychological problems and musical behaviour, which means that emotions can be expressed musically. For patients who have difficulties in expressing emotions, music therapy can be a useful medium. Music therapy might be a useful intervention for breast cancer patients in order to facilitate and enhance their emotional expressivity. Besides analogy, there are further qualities of music that can be beneficial within therapeutic treatment. One of these qualities is symbolism: music can symbolize persons, objects, incidents, experiences or memories of daily life. Therefore, music is a reality, which represents another reality. The symbolism of the musical reality enables the patient to deal safely with the other reality for it evokes memories about persons, objects or incidents. These associations can be perceived as positive or negative, so they release emotions in the patient. Music therapy both addresses physical and psychological needs of the patient. Numerous studies indicate that music therapy can be beneficial to both acute cancer patients and palliative cancer patients in the final stage of disease. Most research with acute cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, surgery or stem cell transplantation examined the effectiveness of receptive music therapy. Listening to music during chemotherapy, either played live by the music therapist or from tape has a positive effect on pain perception, relaxation, anxiety and mood. There was also found a decrease in diastolic blood pressure or heart rate and an improvement in fatigue; insomnia and appetite loss could be significantly decreased in patients older than 45 years. Further improvements by receptive music therapy were found for physical comfort, vitality, dizziness and tolerability of the chemotherapy. A study with patients undergoing surgery found that receptive music therapy led to decreased anxiety, stress and relaxation levels before, during and after surgery. Music therapy can also be applied in palliative situations, for example to patients with terminal cancer who live in hospices. Studies indicate that music therapy may be beneficial for cancer patients in acute and palliative situations, but the benefits of music therapy for convalescing cancer patients remain unclear. Whereas music therapy interventions for acute and palliative patients often focus on physiological and psychosomatic symptoms, such as pain perception and reducing medical side-effects, music therapy with posthospital curative treatment could have its main focus on psychological aspects. A cancer patient is not free from cancer until five years after the tumour ablation. The patient fears that the cancer has not been defeated. In this stage of the disease, patients frequently feel insecure, depressive and are emotionally unstable. How to handle irksome and negative emotions is an important issue for many oncology patients. After the difficult period of the medical treatment, which they often have overcome in a prosaic way by masking emotions, patients often express the wish to become aware of themselves again. They may wish to grapple with negative emotions due to their disease. Other patients wish to experience positive feelings, such as enjoyment and vitality. The results indicate that music therapy can also have positive influences on well-being of cancer patients in the post-hospital curative stage as well as they offer valuable information about patients needs in this state of treatment and how effects can be dealt with properly. (Adapted fromhttps://essay.utwente.nl/59115/1/scriptie_F_Teiwes.pdf- Access on 25/02/19) Regarding music therapy in cancer treatment

Questão 46
2020Inglês

(AFA - 2020) Music therapy with cancer patients Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, in Germany and in many other industrialized countries. In 2007, about 12 million people were diagnosed with cancer worldwide with a mortality rate of 7.6 million (American Cancer Society, 2007). In the industrial countries, the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men are prostate cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer. Women are most commonly diagnosed with breast cancer, gastric cancer and lung cancer. The symptoms of cancer depend on the type of the disease, but there are common symptoms caused by cancer and/or by its medical treatment (e.g., chemotherapy and radiation). Common physical symptoms are pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, loss of appetite, nausea (feeling sick, vomiting), dizziness, limited physical activity, hair loss, a sore mouth/throat and bowel problems. Cancer also often causes psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, mood disturbances, stress, insecurity, grief and decreased self-esteem. This, in turn, can implicate social consequences. Social isolation can occur due to physical or psychological symptoms (for example, feeling too tired to meet friends, cutting oneself off due to depressive complaints). Besides conventional pharmacological treatments of cancer, there are treatments to meet psychological and physical needs of the patient. Psychological consequences of cancer, such as depression, anxiety or loss of control, can be counteracted by psychotherapy. For example, within cognitive therapy cancer patients may develop coping strategies to handle the disease. Research indicates that music therapy, which is a form of psychotherapy, can have positive effects on both physiological and psychological symptoms of cancer patients as well as in acute or palliative situations. There are several definitions of music therapy. According to the World Federation of Music Therapy (WFMT, 1996), music therapy is: the use of music and/or its music elements (sound, rhythm, melody and harmony) by a qualified music therapist, with a client or group, in a process designed to facilitate and promote communication, relationship, learning, mobilization, expression, organization, and other relevant therapeutic objectives, in order to meet physical, emotional, mental, social and cognitive needs. The Dutch Music Therapy Association (NVCT, 1999) defines music therapy as a methodological form of assistance in which musical means are used within a therapeutic relation to manage changes, developments, stabilisation or acceptance on the emotional, behavioural, cognitive, social or on the physical field. The assumption is that the patients musical behaviour conforms to their general behaviour. The starting points are the features of the patients specific disorder or disease pattern. There is an analogy between psychological problems and musical behaviour, which means that emotions can be expressed musically. For patients who have difficulties in expressing emotions, music therapy can be a useful medium. Music therapy might be a useful intervention for breast cancer patients in order to facilitate and enhance their emotional expressivity. Besides analogy, there are further qualities of music that can be beneficial within therapeutic treatment. One of these qualities is symbolism: music can symbolize persons, objects, incidents, experiences or memories of daily life. Therefore, music is a reality, which represents another reality. The symbolism of the musical reality enables the patient to deal safely with the other reality for it evokes memories about persons, objects or incidents. These associations can be perceived as positive or negative, so they release emotions in the patient. Music therapy both addresses physical and psychological needs of the patient. Numerous studies indicate that music therapy can be beneficial to both acute cancer patients and palliative cancer patients in the final stage of disease. Most research with acute cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, surgery or stem cell transplantation examined the effectiveness of receptive music therapy. Listening to music during chemotherapy, either played live by the music therapist or from tape has a positive effect on pain perception, relaxation, anxiety and mood. There was also found a decrease in diastolic blood pressure or heart rate and an improvement in fatigue; insomnia and appetite loss could be significantly decreased in patients older than 45 years. Further improvements by receptive music therapy were found for physical comfort, vitality, dizziness and tolerability of the chemotherapy. A study with patients undergoing surgery found that receptive music therapy led to decreased anxiety, stress and relaxation levels before, during and after surgery. Music therapy can also be applied in palliative situations, for example to patients with terminal cancer who live in hospices. Studies indicate that music therapy may be beneficial for cancer patients in acute and palliative situations, but the benefits of music therapy for convalescing cancer patients remain unclear. Whereas music therapy interventions for acute and palliative patients often focus on physiological and psychosomatic symptoms, such as pain perception and reducing medical side-effects, music therapy with posthospital curative treatment could have its main focus on psychological aspects. A cancer patient is not free from cancer until five years after the tumour ablation. The patient fears that the cancer has not been defeated. In this stage of the disease, patients frequently feel insecure, depressive and are emotionally unstable. How to handle irksome and negative emotions is an important issue for many oncology patients. After the difficult period of the medical treatment, which they often have overcome in a prosaic way by masking emotions, patients often express the wish to become aware of themselves again. They may wish to grapple with negative emotions due to their disease. Other patients wish to experience positive feelings, such as enjoyment and vitality. The results indicate that music therapy can also have positive influences on well-being of cancer patients in the post-hospital curative stage as well as they offer valuable information about patients needs in this state of treatment and how effects can be dealt with properly. (Adapted fromhttps://essay.utwente.nl/59115/1/scriptie_F_Teiwes.pdf- Access on 25/02/19) Read the statement based on paragraph 8 and mark the action that happened first A study discovered that receptive musci therapy had decreased anxiety ans stress levels before, during and after surferires. Also, music therapy can be applied to differente levels of the disease.

Questão 47
2020Inglês

(AFA - 2020) Music therapy with cancer patients Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, in Germany and in many other industrialized countries. In 2007, about 12 million people were diagnosed with cancer worldwide with a mortality rate of 7.6 million (American Cancer Society, 2007). In the industrial countries, the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men are prostate cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer. Women are most commonly diagnosed with breast cancer, gastric cancer and lung cancer. The symptoms of cancer depend on the type of the disease, but there are common symptoms caused by cancer and/or by its medical treatment (e.g., chemotherapy and radiation). Common physical symptoms are pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, loss of appetite, nausea (feeling sick, vomiting), dizziness, limited physical activity, hair loss, a sore mouth/throat and bowel problems. Cancer also often causes psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, mood disturbances, stress, insecurity, grief and decreased self-esteem. This, in turn, can implicate social consequences. Social isolation can occur due to physical or psychological symptoms (for example, feeling too tired to meet friends, cutting oneself off due to depressive complaints). Besides conventional pharmacological treatments of cancer, there are treatments to meet psychological and physical needs of the patient. Psychological consequences of cancer, such as depression, anxiety or loss of control, can be counteracted by psychotherapy. For example, within cognitive therapy cancer patients may develop coping strategies to handle the disease. Research indicates that music therapy, which is a form of psychotherapy, can have positive effects on both physiological and psychological symptoms of cancer patients as well as in acute or palliative situations. There are several definitions of music therapy. According to the World Federation of Music Therapy (WFMT, 1996), music therapy is: the use of music and/or its music elements (sound, rhythm, melody and harmony) by a qualified music therapist, with a client or group, in a process designed to facilitate and promote communication, relationship, learning, mobilization, expression, organization, and other relevant therapeutic objectives, in order to meet physical, emotional, mental, social and cognitive needs. The Dutch Music Therapy Association (NVCT, 1999) defines music therapy as a methodological form of assistance in which musical means are used within a therapeutic relation to manage changes, developments, stabilisation or acceptance on the emotional, behavioural, cognitive, social or on the physical field. The assumption is that the patients musical behaviour conforms to their general behaviour. The starting points are the features of the patients specific disorder or disease pattern. There is an analogy between psychological problems and musical behaviour, which means that emotions can be expressed musically. For patients who have difficulties in expressing emotions, music therapy can be a useful medium. Music therapy might be a useful intervention for breast cancer patients in order to facilitate and enhance their emotional expressivity. Besides analogy, there are further qualities of music that can be beneficial within therapeutic treatment. One of these qualities is symbolism: music can symbolize persons, objects, incidents, experiences or memories of daily life. Therefore, music is a reality, which represents another reality. The symbolism of the musical reality enables the patient to deal safely with the other reality for it evokes memories about persons, objects or incidents. These associations can be perceived as positive or negative, so they release emotions in the patient. Music therapy both addresses physical and psychological needs of the patient. Numerous studies indicate that music therapy can be beneficial to both acute cancer patients and palliative cancer patients in the final stage of disease. Most research with acute cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, surgery or stem cell transplantation examined the effectiveness of receptive music therapy. Listening to music during chemotherapy, either played live by the music therapist or from tape has a positive effect on pain perception, relaxation, anxiety and mood. There was also found a decrease in diastolic blood pressure or heart rate and an improvement in fatigue; insomnia and appetite loss could be significantly decreased in patients older than 45 years. Further improvements by receptive music therapy were found for physical comfort, vitality, dizziness and tolerability of the chemotherapy. A study with patients undergoing surgery found that receptive music therapy led to decreased anxiety, stress and relaxation levels before, during and after surgery. Music therapy can also be applied in palliative situations, for example to patients with terminal cancer who live in hospices. Studies indicate that music therapy may be beneficial for cancer patients in acute and palliative situations, but the benefits of music therapy for convalescing cancer patients remain unclear. Whereas music therapy interventions for acute and palliative patients often focus on physiological and psychosomatic symptoms, such as pain perception and reducing medical side-effects, music therapy with posthospital curative treatment could have its main focus on psychological aspects. A cancer patient is not free from cancer until five years after the tumour ablation. The patient fears that the cancer has not been defeated. In this stage of the disease, patients frequently feel insecure, depressive and are emotionally unstable. How to handle irksome and negative emotions is an important issue for many oncology patients. After the difficult period of the medical treatment, which they often have overcome in a prosaic way by masking emotions, patients often express the wish to become aware of themselves again. They may wish to grapple with negative emotions due to their disease. Other patients wish to experience positive feelings, such as enjoyment and vitality. The results indicate that music therapy can also have positive influences on well-being of cancer patients in the post-hospital curative stage as well as they offer valuable information about patients needs in this state of treatment and how effects can be dealt with properly. (Adapted fromhttps://essay.utwente.nl/59115/1/scriptie_F_Teiwes.pdf- Access on 25/02/19) In the fragment music therapy with post-hospital curative treatment could have its main focus on psychological aspects (paragraph 9) the pronoun refers to

Questão 48
2020Inglês

(AFA - 2020) Music therapy with cancer patients Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, in Germany and in many other industrialized countries. In 2007, about 12 million people were diagnosed with cancer worldwide with a mortality rate of 7.6 million (American Cancer Society, 2007). In the industrial countries, the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men are prostate cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer. Women are most commonly diagnosed with breast cancer, gastric cancer and lung cancer. The symptoms of cancer depend on the type of the disease, but there are common symptoms caused by cancer and/or by its medical treatment (e.g., chemotherapy and radiation). Common physical symptoms are pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, loss of appetite, nausea (feeling sick, vomiting), dizziness, limited physical activity, hair loss, a sore mouth/throat and bowel problems. Cancer also often causes psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, mood disturbances, stress, insecurity, grief and decreased self-esteem. This, in turn, can implicate social consequences. Social isolation can occur due to physical or psychological symptoms (for example, feeling too tired to meet friends, cutting oneself off due to depressive complaints). Besides conventional pharmacological treatments of cancer, there are treatments to meet psychological and physical needs of the patient. Psychological consequences of cancer, such as depression, anxiety or loss of control, can be counteracted by psychotherapy. For example, within cognitive therapy cancer patients may develop coping strategies to handle the disease. Research indicates that music therapy, which is a form of psychotherapy, can have positive effects on both physiological and psychological symptoms of cancer patients as well as in acute or palliative situations. There are several definitions of music therapy. According to the World Federation of Music Therapy (WFMT, 1996), music therapy is: the use of music and/or its music elements (sound, rhythm, melody and harmony) by a qualified music therapist, with a client or group, in a process designed to facilitate and promote communication, relationship, learning, mobilization, expression, organization, and other relevant therapeutic objectives, in order to meet physical, emotional, mental, social and cognitive needs. The Dutch Music Therapy Association (NVCT, 1999) defines music therapy as a methodological form of assistance in which musical means are used within a therapeutic relation to manage changes, developments, stabilisation or acceptance on the emotional, behavioural, cognitive, social or on the physical field. The assumption is that the patients musical behaviour conforms to their general behaviour. The starting points are the features of the patients specific disorder or disease pattern. There is an analogy between psychological problems and musical behaviour, which means that emotions can be expressed musically. For patients who have difficulties in expressing emotions, music therapy can be a useful medium. Music therapy might be a useful intervention for breast cancer patients in order to facilitate and enhance their emotional expressivity. Besides analogy, there are further qualities of music that can be beneficial within therapeutic treatment. One of these qualities is symbolism: music can symbolize persons, objects, incidents, experiences or memories of daily life. Therefore, music is a reality, which represents another reality. The symbolism of the musical reality enables the patient to deal safely with the other reality for it evokes memories about persons, objects or incidents. These associations can be perceived as positive or negative, so they release emotions in the patient. Music therapy both addresses physical and psychological needs of the patient. Numerous studies indicate that music therapy can be beneficial to both acute cancer patients and palliative cancer patients in the final stage of disease. Most research with acute cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, surgery or stem cell transplantation examined the effectiveness of receptive music therapy. Listening to music during chemotherapy, either played live by the music therapist or from tape has a positive effect on pain perception, relaxation, anxiety and mood. There was also found a decrease in diastolic blood pressure or heart rate and an improvement in fatigue; insomnia and appetite loss could be significantly decreased in patients older than 45 years. Further improvements by receptive music therapy were found for physical comfort, vitality, dizziness and tolerability of the chemotherapy. A study with patients undergoing surgery found that receptive music therapy led to decreased anxiety, stress and relaxation levels before, during and after surgery. Music therapy can also be applied in palliative situations, for example to patients with terminal cancer who live in hospices. Studies indicate that music therapy may be beneficial for cancer patients in acute and palliative situations, but the benefits of music therapy for convalescing cancer patients remain unclear. Whereas music therapy interventions for acute and palliative patients often focus on physiological and psychosomatic symptoms, such as pain perception and reducing medical side-effects, music therapy with posthospital curative treatment could have its main focus on psychological aspects. A cancer patient is not free from cancer until five years after the tumour ablation. The patient fears that the cancer has not been defeated. In this stage of the disease, patients frequently feel insecure, depressive and are emotionally unstable. How to handle irksome and negative emotions is an important issue for many oncology patients. After the difficult period of the medical treatment, which they often have overcome in a prosaic way by masking emotions, patients often express the wish to become aware of themselves again. They may wish to grapple with negative emotions due to their disease. Other patients wish to experience positive feelings, such as enjoyment and vitality. The results indicate that music therapy can also have positive influences on well-being of cancer patients in the post-hospital curative stage as well as they offer valuable information about patients needs in this state of treatment and how effects can be dealt with properly. (Adapted fromhttps://essay.utwente.nl/59115/1/scriptie_F_Teiwes.pdf- Access on 25/02/19) One concludes that

Questão 49
2020Física

(AFA - 2020) Em um local onde a acelerao da gravidade g, as partculas idnticas, 1 e 2, so lanadas simultaneamente, e sobem sem atrito ao longo dos planos inclinados AC e BC, respectivamente, conforme figura a seguir. A partcula 2 lanada do ponto B com velocidade v0e gasta um tempo t para chegar ao ponto C. Considerando que as partculas 1 e 2 colidem no vrtice C, ento a velocidade de lanamento da partcula 1 vale

Questão 50
2020Física

(AFA - 2020) A figura a seguir, em que as polias e os fios so ideais, ilustra uma montagem realizada num local onde a acelerao da gravidade constante e igual a g, a resistncia do ar e as dimenses dos blocos A, B, C e D so desprezveis. O bloco B desliza com atrito sobre a superfcie de uma mesa plana e horizontal, e o bloco A desce verticalmenet com acelerao conctante de mdulo a. O bloco C desliza com atrito sobre o bloco B, e o bloco D desce verticalmente com acelerao constante de mdulo 2a. As massas dos blocos A, B e D so iguais, e a massa do bloco C o triplo da massa do bloco A. Nessas condies, o coeficiente de atrito cintico, que o mesmo para todas as superfcies em contato, pode ser expresso pela razo

Questão 51
2020Física

QUESTO ANULADA!! (AFA - 2020) Certo brinquedo de um parque aqutico esquematizado pela figura a seguir, onde um homem e uma boia, sobre a qual se assenta, formam um sistema, tratado como partcula. Essa partcula inicia seu movimento do repouso, no ponto A, situado a uma altura H = 15 m, escorregando ao longo do tobogua que est inclinado de 60 em relao ao solo, plano e horizontal. Considere a acelerao da gravidade constante e igual a g e despreze as resistncias do ar, do tobogua e os efeitos hidrodinmicos sobre a partcula. Para fre-la, fazendo-a chegar ao ponto C com velocidade nula, um elstico inicialmente no deformado, que se comporta como uma mola ideal, foi acoplado ligando essa partcula ao topo do tobogua. Nessa circunstncia, a deformao mxima sofrida pelo elstico foi de 10 m Na descida, ao passar pelo ponto B, que se encontra a uma altura , a partcula atinge sua velocidade mxima, que, em m/s, vale. a) 6,0 b) 8,5 c) 10 d) 12 QUESTO ANULADA!!

Questão 51
2020Física

(AFA - 2020) Certo brinquedo de um parque aqutico esquematizado pela figura a seguir, onde um homem e uma boia, sobre a qual se assenta, formam um sistema, tratado como partcula. Essa partcula inicia seu movimento do repouso, no ponto A, situado a uma altura H = 15 m, escorregando ao longo do tobogua que est inclinado de 60 em relao ao solo, plano e horizontal. Considere a acelerao da gravidade constante e igual a g e despreze as resistncias do ar, do tobogua e os efeitos hidrodinmicos sobre a partcula. Para fre-la, fazendo-a chegar ao ponto C com velocidade nula, um elsticoinicialmente no deformado, que se comporta como uma mola ideal, foi acoplado ligando essa partcula ao topo do tobogua. Nessa circunstncia, a deformao mxima sofrida pelo elstico foi dem. Na descida, ao passar pelo ponto B, que se encontra a uma altura H/2, a partcula atinge sua velocidade mxima, que, em m/s, vale

Questão 52
2020Física

(AFA - 2020) A partcula 1, no ponto A, sofre uma coliso perfeitamente elstica e faz com que a partcula 2, inicialmente em repouso, percorra, sobre uma superfcie, a trajetria ABMCD, conforme figura a seguir. O trecho BMC um arco de 90 de uma circunferncia de raio R = 1,0 m. Ao passar sobre o ponto M a partcula 2 est na iminncia de perder o contato com a superfcie. A energia mecnica perdida, devido ao atrito, pela partcula 2 ao longo do trecho ABM exatamente igual que ela perde no trecho MCD. No ponto D, a partcula 2 sogre outra coliso, perfeitamente elstica, com a partcula 3, que est em repouso. As partculas 1 e 3 possuem a mesma massa, sendo a massa de cada uma delas o dobro da massa da partcula 2. A velocidade da partcula 1, imediatamente antes da coliso no ponto A, era de 6,0 m/s. A acelerao da gravidade constante e igual a g. Desprezando a resistncia do ar, a velocidade da partcula 3, imediatamente aps a coliso no ponto D, em m/s, ser igual a:

Questão 53
2020Física

(AFA - 2020) Um pequeno tubo de ensaio, de massa 50 g, no formato de cilindro , usado como ludio - uma espcie de submarino miniatura, que sobe e desce, verticalmente, dentro de uma garrafa cheia de gua. A figura 1, a seguir, ilustra uma montagem, onde o tubo, preenchido parcialmente de gua, mergulhado numa garrafa pet, completamente cheia de gua. O tubo fica com sua extremidade aberta voltada para baixo e uma bolha de ar, de massa desprezvel, aprisionada dentro do tubo, formando com ele o sistema chamado ludio. A garrafa hermeticamente fechada e o ludio tem sua extremidade superior fechada e encostada na tampa da garrafa. Uma pessoa, ao aplicar, com a mo, uma presso constante sobre a garrafa faz com que entre um pouco mais de gua no ludio, comprimindo a bolha de ar. Nessa condio, o ludio desce, conforme figura 2, a partir do repouso, com acelerao constante, percorrendo 60 cm, at chegar ao fundo da garrafa, em 1,0 s. Aps chegar ao fundo, estando o ludio em repouso, a pessoa deixa de pressionar a garrafa. A bolha expande e o ludio sobe, conforme figura 3, percorrendo os 60 cm em 0,5 s. Despreze o atrito viscoso sobre o ludio e considere que, ao longo da descida e da subida, o volume da bolha permana constante e igual a V0e V, respectivamente. Nessas condies, a variao de volume,, em cm3, igual a

Questão 54
2020Física

(AFA - 2020) Uma fora vertical de mdulo F atua em um ponto P de uma alavanca rgida e homognea que pode girar em torno de um eixo O. A alavanca possui comprimento d, entre os pontos P e O, e faz um ngulocom a direo horizontal, conforme figura abaixo. A foragera, assim, um torque sobre a alavanca. Considere uma outra fora, de menor mdulo possvel, que pode ser aplicada sozinha no ponto P e causar o mesmo torque gerado pela fora. Nessas condies, a opo que melhor apresenta a direo, sentido e mdulo G da fora

Questão 55
2020Física

(AFA - 2020) O grfico da energia potencial (Ep) de uma dada partcula em funo de sua posio x apresentado na figura abaixo. Quando a partcula colocada com velocidade nula nas posies x1, x2, x3, x4e x5, esta permanece em repouso de acordo com a 1 Lei de Newton. Considerando essas informaes, caso haja um perturbao sobre a partcula, ela poder oscilar em movimento harmnico simples em torno das posies

Questão 56
2020Física

(AFA - 2020) Considere uma mquina trmica ideal M que funciona realizando o ciclo de Carnot, como mostra a figura abaixo. Essa mquina retira uma quantidade de calor Q de um reservatrio trmico temperatura constante T, realiza um trabalho totale rejeita um calor Q2para a fonte fria temperatura T/2, tambm constante. A partir das mesmas fontes quente e fria projeta-se quatro mquinas trmicas A, B, C e D, respectivamente, de acordo com as figuras 1, 2, 3 e 4 abaixo; para que realizem, cada uma, o mesmo trabalhoda mquina M rejeitapara a fonte fria a uma temperatura Nessas condies, as mquinas trmicas que poderiam ser construdasa partir dos projetos apresentados, seriam

Questão 57
2020Física

(AFA - 2020) Um objeto pontual luminoso que oscila verticalmente em movimento harmnico simples, cuja equao da posio y = A.cos(t), disposto paralelamente a um espelho esfrico gaussiano cncavo (E) de raio de curvatura igual a 8A, e a uma distncia 3A desse espelho (figura 1). Um observador visualiza a imagem desse objeto conjugada pelo espelho e mede a amplitude A1 e a frequncia de oscilao do movimento dessa imagem. Trocando-se apenas o espelho por uma lente esfrica convergente delgada (L) de distncia focal A e ndice de refrao n = 2 (figura 2), o mesmo observador visualiza uma imagem projetada do objeto oscilante e mede a amplitude A2 e a frequncia do movimento da imagem. Considere que o eixo ptico dos dispositivos usados passe pelo ponto de equilbrio estvel do corpo que oscila e que as observaes foram realizadas em um meio perfeitamente transparente e homogneo de ndice de refrao igual a 1. Nessas condies, a razo entre as amplitudes A2 e A1,A2/A1, de oscilao das imagens conjugadas pela lente e pelo espelho

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