Questões de Inglês - UNESP

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Questão 21
2019Inglês

Leia o trecho do artigo de Jason Farago, publicado pelo jornal The New York Times, para responder às questões 21 e 22. She led Latin American Art in a bold new direction Antropofagia (Cannibalism), 1929, a seminal work of Brazilian Modernism by Tarsila do Amaral that is part of a new show of her work at MoMA. In 1928, Tarsila do Amaral painted Abaporu, a landmark work of Brazilian Modernism, in which a nude figure, half-human and half-animal, looks down at his massive, swollen foot, several times the size of his head. Abaporu inspired Tarsilas husband at the time, the poet Oswald de Andrade, to write his celebrated Cannibal Manifesto, which flayed Brazils belletrist writers and called for an embrace of local influences in fact, for a devouring of them. The European stereotype of native Brazilians as cannibals would be reformatted as a cultural virtue. More than a social and literary reform movement, cannibalism would form the basis for a new Brazilian nationalism, in which, as de Andrade wrote, we made Christ to be born in Bahia. The unconventional nudes of A Negra, a painting produced in 1923, and Abaporu unite in Tarsilas final great painting, Antropofagia, a marriage of two figures that is also a marriage of Old World and New. The couple sit entangled, her breast drooping over his knee, their giant feet crossed one over the other, while, behind them, a banana leaf grows as large as a cactus. The sun, high above the primordial couple, is a wedge of lemon. (Jason Farago. www.nytimes.com, 15.02.2018. Adaptado.) De acordo com o artigo de Jason Farago, o Manifesto Antropofágico, escrito por Oswald de Andrade, foi influenciado

Questão 22
2019Inglês

Leia o trecho do artigo de Jason Farago, publicado pelo jornal The New York Times, para responder às questões 21 e 22. She led Latin American Art in a bold new direction Antropofagia (Cannibalism), 1929, a seminal work of Brazilian Modernism by Tarsila do Amaral that is part of a new show of her work at MoMA. In 1928, Tarsila do Amaral painted Abaporu, a landmark work of Brazilian Modernism, in which a nude figure, half-human and half-animal, looks down at his massive, swollen foot, several times the size of his head. Abaporu inspired Tarsilas husband at the time, the poet Oswald de Andrade, to write his celebrated Cannibal Manifesto, which flayed Brazils belletrist writers and called for an embrace of local influences in fact, for a devouring of them. The European stereotype of native Brazilians as cannibals would be reformatted as a cultural virtue. More than a social and literary reform movement, cannibalism would form the basis for a new Brazilian nationalism, in which, as de Andrade wrote, we made Christ to be born in Bahia. The unconventional nudes of A Negra, a painting produced in 1923, and Abaporu unite in Tarsilas final great painting, Antropofagia, a marriage of two figures that is also a marriage of Old World and New. The couple sit entangled, her breast drooping over his knee, their giant feet crossed one over the other, while, behind them, a banana leaf grows as large as a cactus. The sun, high above the primordial couple, is a wedge of lemon. (Jason Farago. www.nytimes.com, 15.02.2018. Adaptado.) A obra Antropofagia (Cannibalism) de Tarsila do Amaral, apresentada na imagem, é interpretada pelo autor do artigo como:

Questão 23
2019Inglês

Based on the information presented by the map, one can say that, from 1731 to 1775,

Questão 24
2019Inglês

Prescriptions for fighting epidemics Epidemics have plagued humanity since the dawn of settled life. Yet, success in conquering them remains patchy. Experts predict that a global one that could kill more than 300 million people would come round in the next 20 to 40 years.What pathogen would cause it is anybodys guess. Chances are that it will be a virus that lurks in birds or mammals, or one that that has not yet hatched. The scariest are both highly lethal and spread easily among humans. Thankfully, bugs that excel at the first tend to be weak at the other. But mutations ordinary business for germs can change that in a blink. Moreover, when humans get too close to beasts, either wild or packed in farms, an animal disease can become a human one. A front-runner for global pandemics is the seasonal influenza virus, which mutates so much that a vaccine must be custom-made every year. The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, which killed 50 million to 100 million people, was a potent version of the swine flu that emerged in 2009. The H5N1 avian flu strain, deadly in 60% of cases, came about in the 1990s when a virus that sickened birds made the jump to a human. Ebola, HIV and Zika took a similar route. (www.economist.com, 08.02.2018. Adaptado.) De acordo com o primeiro parágrafo,

Questão 25
2019Inglês

Prescriptions for fighting epidemics Epidemics have plagued humanity since the dawn of settled life. Yet, success in conquering them remains patchy. Experts predict that a global one that could kill more than 300 million people would come round in the next 20 to 40 years.What pathogen would cause it is anybodys guess. Chances are that it will be a virus that lurks in birds or mammals, or one that that has not yet hatched. The scariest are both highly lethal and spread easily among humans. Thankfully, bugs that excel at the first tend to be weak at the other. But mutations ordinary business for germs can change that in a blink. Moreover, when humans get too close to beasts, either wild or packed in farms, an animal disease can become a human one. A front-runner for global pandemics is the seasonal influenza virus, which mutates so much that a vaccine must be custom-made every year. The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, which killed 50 million to 100 million people, was a potent version of the swine flu that emerged in 2009. The H5N1 avian flu strain, deadly in 60% of cases, came about in the 1990s when a virus that sickened birds made the jump to a human. Ebola, HIV and Zika took a similar route. (www.economist.com, 08.02.2018. Adaptado.) No trecho do primeiro parágrafo or one that that has not yet hatched, o termo sublinhado refere-se a:

Questão 26
2019Inglês

Prescriptions for fighting epidemics Epidemics have plagued humanity since the dawn of settled life. Yet, success in conquering them remains patchy. Experts predict that a global one that could kill more than 300 million people would come round in the next 20 to 40 years.What pathogen would cause it is anybodys guess. Chances are that it will be a virus that lurks in birds or mammals, or one that that has not yet hatched. The scariest are both highly lethal and spread easily among humans. Thankfully, bugs that excel at the first tend to be weak at the other. But mutations ordinary business for germs can change that in a blink. Moreover, when humans get too close to beasts, either wild or packed in farms, an animal disease can become a human one. A front-runner for global pandemics is the seasonal influenza virus, which mutates so much that a vaccine must be custom-made every year. The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, which killed 50 million to 100 million people, was a potent version of the swine flu that emerged in 2009. The H5N1 avian flu strain, deadly in 60% of cases, came about in the 1990s when a virus that sickened birds made the jump to a human. Ebola, HIV and Zika took a similar route. (www.economist.com, 08.02.2018. Adaptado.) De acordo com o texto, os especialistas

Questão 27
2019Inglês

Prescriptions for fighting epidemics Epidemics have plagued humanity since the dawn of settled life. Yet, success in conquering them remains patchy. Experts predict that a global one that could kill more than 300 million people would come round in the next 20 to 40 years.What pathogen would cause it is anybodys guess. Chances are that it will be a virus that lurks in birds or mammals, or one that that has not yet hatched. The scariest are both highly lethal and spread easily among humans. Thankfully, bugs that excel at the first tend to be weak at the other. But mutations ordinary business for germs can change that in a blink. Moreover, when humans get too close to beasts, either wild or packed in farms, an animal disease can become a human one. A front-runner for global pandemics is the seasonal influenza virus, which mutates so much that a vaccine must be custom-made every year. The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, which killed 50 million to 100 million people, was a potent version of the swine flu that emerged in 2009. The H5N1 avian flu strain, deadly in 60% of cases, came about in the 1990s when a virus that sickened birds made the jump to a human. Ebola, HIV and Zika took a similar route. (www.economist.com, 08.02.2018. Adaptado.) No trecho do primeiro parágrafo Yet, success in conquering them remains patchy, o termo sublinhado equivale, em português, a:

Questão 28
2019Inglês

Prescriptions for fighting epidemics Epidemics have plagued humanity since the dawn of settled life. Yet, success in conquering them remains patchy. Experts predict that a global one that could kill more than 300 million people would come round in the next 20 to 40 years.What pathogen would cause it is anybodys guess. Chances are that it will be a virus that lurks in birds or mammals, or one that that has not yet hatched. The scariest are both highly lethal and spread easily among humans. Thankfully, bugs that excel at the first tend to be weak at the other. But mutations ordinary business for germs can change that in a blink. Moreover, when humans get too close to beasts, either wild or packed in farms, an animal disease can become a human one. A front-runner for global pandemics is the seasonal influenza virus, which mutates so much that a vaccine must be custom-made every year. The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, which killed 50 million to 100 million people, was a potent version of the swine flu that emerged in 2009. The H5N1 avian flu strain, deadly in 60% of cases, came about in the 1990s when a virus that sickened birds made the jump to a human. Ebola, HIV and Zika took a similar route. (www.economist.com, 08.02.2018. Adaptado.) No trecho do primeiro parágrafo can change that in a blink, a expressão sublinhada tem sentido de:

Questão 29
2019Inglês

Prescriptions for fighting epidemics Epidemics have plagued humanity since the dawn of settled life. Yet, success in conquering them remains patchy. Experts predict that a global one that could kill more than 300 million people would come round in the next 20 to 40 years.What pathogen would cause it is anybodys guess. Chances are that it will be a virus that lurks in birds or mammals, or one that that has not yet hatched. The scariest are both highly lethal and spread easily among humans. Thankfully, bugs that excel at the first tend to be weak at the other. But mutations ordinary business for germs can change that in a blink. Moreover, when humans get too close to beasts, either wild or packed in farms, an animal disease can become a human one. A front-runner for global pandemics is the seasonal influenza virus, which mutates so much that a vaccine must be custom-made every year. The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, which killed 50 million to 100 million people, was a potent version of the swine flu that emerged in 2009. The H5N1 avian flu strain, deadly in 60% of cases, came about in the 1990s when a virus that sickened birds made the jump to a human. Ebola, HIV and Zika took a similar route. (www.economist.com, 08.02.2018. Adaptado.) No trecho do primeiro parágrafo Moreover, when humans get too close to beasts, o termo sublinhado indica:

Questão 30
2019Inglês

Prescriptions for fighting epidemics Epidemics have plagued humanity since the dawn of settled life. Yet, success in conquering them remains patchy. Experts predict that a global one that could kill more than 300 million people would come round in the next 20 to 40 years.What pathogen would cause it is anybodys guess. Chances are that it will be a virus that lurks in birds or mammals, or one that that has not yet hatched. The scariest are both highly lethal and spread easily among humans. Thankfully, bugs that excel at the first tend to be weak at the other. But mutations ordinary business for germs can change that in a blink. Moreover, when humans get too close to beasts, either wild or packed in farms, an animal disease can become a human one. A front-runner for global pandemics is the seasonal influenza virus, which mutates so much that a vaccine must be custom-made every year. The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, which killed 50 million to 100 million people, was a potent version of the swine flu that emerged in 2009. The H5N1 avian flu strain, deadly in 60% of cases, came about in the 1990s when a virus that sickened birds made the jump to a human. Ebola, HIV and Zika took a similar route. (www.economist.com, 08.02.2018. Adaptado.) De acordo com o segundo parágrafo,

Questão 33
2019Inglês

(Unesp 2019 - Segunda fase)Leia o texto para responder, em português, às questões 33, 34 e 36. Medieval Monsters: Terrors, Aliens, Wonders Monsters captivated the imagination of medieval men and women, just as they continue to fascinate us today. Drawing on the Morgans superb collection of illuminated manuscripts, this major exhibition, the first of its kind in North America, will explore the complex social role of monsters in the Middle Ages. Medieval Monsters will lead visitors through three sections based on the ways monsters functioned in medieval societies. Terrors explores how monsters enhanced the aura of those in power, be they rulers, knights, or saints. A second section on Aliens demonstrates how marginalized groups in European societies such as Jews, Muslims, women, the poor, and the disabled were further alienated by being figured as monstrous. The final section, Wonders, considers a group of strange beauties and frightful anomalies that populated the medieval world. Whether employed in ornamental, entertaining, or contemplative settings, these fantastic beings were meant to inspire a sense of marvel and awe in their viewers. Medieval Monsters: Terrors, Aliens, Wonders runs from June 8 to September 23, 2018 at The Morgan Library Museum. (www.themorgan.org, s/d. Adaptado.) a) De acordo com o primeiro parágrafo, qual é a justificativa para uma exposição de iluminuras de monstros da Idade Média atualmente? Qual é a proposta da exposição? b) O que os grupos sociais retratados na seção Aliens têm em comum? Qual era a consequência, na Idade Média, de se retratar esses grupos sociais como monstros?

Questão 34
2019Inglês

(Unesp 2019 - Segunda fase)Leia o texto para responder, em português, às questões 33, 34 e 36. Medieval Monsters: Terrors, Aliens, Wonders Monsters captivated the imagination of medieval men and women, just as they continue to fascinate us today. Drawing on the Morgans superb collection of illuminated manuscripts, this major exhibition, the first of its kind in North America, will explore the complex social role of monsters in the Middle Ages. Medieval Monsters will lead visitors through three sections based on the ways monsters functioned in medieval societies. Terrors explores how monsters enhanced the aura of those in power, be they rulers, knights, or saints. A second section on Aliens demonstrates how marginalized groups in European societies such as Jews, Muslims, women, the poor, and the disabled were further alienated by being figured as monstrous. The final section, Wonders, considers a group of strange beauties and frightful anomalies that populated the medieval world. Whether employed in ornamental, entertaining, or contemplative settings, these fantastic beings were meant to inspire a sense of marvel and awe in their viewers. Medieval Monsters: Terrors, Aliens, Wonders runs from June 8 to September 23, 2018 at The Morgan Library Museum. (www.themorgan.org, s/d. Adaptado.) a) Com que função eram empregadas as iluminuras da seção Wonders na Idade Média? Qual era o efeito produzido sobre o público? b) Em que seção da exposição a imagem Siren, apresentada no texto, poderia estar localizada? Justifique sua resposta com base nas características dos grupos representados em cada seção.

Questão 35
2019Inglês

(Unesp 2019 - Segunda fase)Leia o texto para responder, em português, às questões 35 e 36. Medi-evil: the monstrous middle ages Monsters are still everywhere. Godzilla keeps stomping through silver-screen cities, zombies lurch through eight seasons of the TV series The Walking Dead and the vampires of Twilight nibble necks across thousands of pages of the book series by Stephanie Meyer. But those looking for some historical context should head to the Morgan Library and Museum in New York to see around 70 works (such as illuminated manuscripts) from the 9th to the 16th century that show how ogres of the imagination have always inspired terror and wonder. In a time when the distant was unknowable, they filled the gaps. Almost always from afar, the monster was a substitute for those perceived to stray from the norm. Keep your eyes peeled for a perennial medieval favourite, the Blemmyae: disgusting headless humanoids with their faces transplanted onto their chests. These were quite possibly the inspiration for Guillermo Del Toros Pale Man in the film Pans Labyrinth (2006) a horrifying fellow whose eyeballs peer out abjectly from his clawed hands. (https://espresso.economist.com, 09.06.2018. Adaptado.) a) De acordo com o texto, cite dois exemplos de monstros que ocorrem em obras contemporâneas. b) De acordo com o texto, que tipo de sensação os monstros Blemmyae despertam? Por que os Blemmyae podem ter sido a inspiração para a criação do Homem Pálido no filme O labirinto do fauno (2006)?

Questão 36
2019Inglês

(Unesp 2019 - Segunda fase)Leia o texto para responder, em português, às questões 33, 34 e 36. Medieval Monsters: Terrors, Aliens, Wonders Monsters captivated the imagination of medieval men and women, just as they continue to fascinate us today. Drawing on the Morgans superb collection of illuminated manuscripts, this major exhibition, the first of its kind in North America, will explore the complex social role of monsters in the Middle Ages. Medieval Monsters will lead visitors through three sections based on the ways monsters functioned in medieval societies. Terrors explores how monsters enhanced the aura of those in power, be they rulers, knights, or saints. A second section on Aliens demonstrates how marginalized groups in European societies such as Jews, Muslims, women, the poor, and the disabled were further alienated by being figured as monstrous. The final section, Wonders, considers a group of strange beauties and frightful anomalies that populated the medieval world. Whether employed in ornamental, entertaining, or contemplative settings, these fantastic beings were meant to inspire a sense of marvel and awe in their viewers. Medieval Monsters: Terrors, Aliens, Wonders runs from June 8 to September 23, 2018 at The Morgan Library Museum. (www.themorgan.org, s/d. Adaptado.) Leia o texto para responder, em português, às questões 35 e 36. Medi-evil: the monstrous middle ages Monsters are still everywhere. Godzilla keeps stomping through silver-screen cities, zombies lurch through eight seasons of the TV series The Walking Dead and the vampires of Twilight nibble necks across thousands of pages of the book series by Stephanie Meyer. But those looking for some historical context should head to the Morgan Library and Museum in New York to see around 70 works (such as illuminated manuscripts) from the 9th to the 16th century that show how ogres of the imagination have always inspired terror and wonder. In a time when the distant was unknowable, they filled the gaps. Almost always from afar, the monster was a substitute for those perceived to stray from the norm. Keep your eyes peeled for a perennial medieval favourite, the Blemmyae: disgusting headless humanoids with their faces transplanted onto their chests. These were quite possibly the inspiration for Guillermo Del Toros Pale Man in the film Pans Labyrinth (2006) a horrifying fellow whose eyeballs peer out abjectly from his clawed hands. (https://espresso.economist.com, 09.06.2018. Adaptado.) a) De acordo com o texto, a exposição no Morgan Library and Museum abrange qual período histórico? Quantas obras compõem a exposição? b) No trecho do segundo parágrafo Almost always from afar, the monster was a substitute for those perceived to stray from the norm, os trechos sublinhados podem se referir a que grupos sociais identificados no texto anterior Medieval Monsters: Terrors, Aliens, Wonders? Justifique sua resposta.

Questão
2018Inglês

(Unesp 2018) Assinale a alternativa que completa a lacuna da tira.

NOVIDADES
Kuadro