Gabarito FUVEST - Provas Anteriores

ITA
IME
ENEM
FUVEST
UNICAMP
UNESP
ESPCEX
AFA
Questão 27
2001Inglês

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) Working women in Japan are more likely to be married than not these days, a sharp reversal of the tradi-tional pattern. But for most of them, continuing to work after the wed-ding is an easier choice than having children. Despite some tentative attempts by government and business to make the working world and parenthood compatible, mothers say Japans business culture remains unfriendly to them. Business meetings often begin at 6 p.m. or later, long hours of unpaid overtime are expected, and companies routinely transfer employees to different cities for years. As a result, many women are choosing work over babies, causing the Japanese birthrate to fall to a record low in 1999----- an average 1.34 babies per woman----- an added woe for this aging nation. THE WASHINGTON POST NATIONAL WEEKLY EDITION August 21, 2000 According to the passage, the majority of working women in Japan

Questão 27
2001Biologia

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) Os produtos imediatos da meiose de uma abelha e de uma samambaia so

Questão 28
2001Inglês

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) Working women in Japan are more likely to be married than not these days, a sharp reversal of the tradi-tional pattern. But for most of them, continuing to work after the wed-ding is an easier choice than having children. Despite some tentative attempts by government and business to make the working world and parenthood compatible, mothers say Japans business culture remains unfriendly to them. Business meetings often begin at 6 p.m. or later, long hours of unpaid overtime are expected, and companies routinely transfer employees to different cities for years. As a result, many women are choosing work over babies, causing the Japanese birthrate to fall to a record low in 1999----- an average 1.34 babies per woman----- an added woe for this aging nation. THE WASHINGTON POST NATIONAL WEEKLY EDITION August 21, 2000 attempts (...) to make the working world and parenthood compatible (lines 2-3) means that

Questão 28
2001Biologia

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) Uma pessoa tem alergia a moluscos. Em um restaurante onde soservidos frutos do mar, ela pode comer, sem problemas, pratos que contenham

Questão 29
2001Inglês

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) Working women in Japan are more likely to be married than not these days, a sharp reversal of the tradi-tional pattern. But for most of them, continuing to work after the wed-ding is an easier choice than having children. Despite some tentative attempts by government and business to make the working world and parenthood compatible, mothers say Japans business culture remains unfriendly to them. Business meetings often begin at 6 p.m. or later, long hours of unpaid overtime are expected, and companies routinely transfer employees to different cities for years. As a result, many women are choosing work over babies, causing the Japanese birthrate to fall to a record low in 1999----- an average 1.34 babies per woman----- an added woe for this aging nation. THE WASHINGTON POST NATIONAL WEEKLY EDITION August 21, 2000 Which of these statements is true according to the passage?

Questão 29
2001Biologia

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) Um animal de corpo cilndrico e alongado, dotado de cavidade celmica, apresenta fendas branquiais na faringe durante sua fase embrionria. Esse animal pode ser:

Questão 30
2001Inglês

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) It is a nice irony, given that scientific genetics started with the manipulation of a crop plant, the pea, that the most vehement public opposition to it in recent years has come from those who object to the genetic manipulation of crops. At the moment, so-called genetically modified (GM) crops are in disgrace. Consumers, particularly in Europe, are wary of buying food that may contain them. Environmental activists are ripping up fields where they are being tested experimentally. And companies that design them are selling off their GM subsidiaries, or even themselves, to anyone willing to take on the risk. Yet the chances are that this is just a passing fad. No trial has shown a health risk from a commercially approved GM crop (or, more correctly, a transgenic crop, as all crop plants have been genetically modified by selective breeding since time immemorial). And while the environmental risks, such as cross-pollination with wild species and the promotion of insecticide-resistant strains of pest, look more plausible, they also look no worse than the sorts of environmental havoc wreaked by more traditional sorts of agriculture. THE ECONOMIST JULY 1ST 2000 According to the passage,

Questão 30
2001Biologia

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) Uma pessoa pretende processar um hospital com o argumento de que a doena de Chagas, da qual portadora, foi ali adquirida em uma transfuso de sangue. A acusao

Questão 31
2001Biologia

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) Uma pessoa passar a excretar maior quantidade de uria se aumentar, em sua dieta alimentar, a quantidade de

Questão 31
2001Inglês

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) It is a nice irony, given that scientific genetics started with the manipulation of a crop plant, the pea, that the most vehement public opposition to it in recent years has come from those who object to the genetic manipulation of crops. At the moment, so-called genetically modified (GM) crops are in disgrace. Consumers, particularly in Europe, are wary of buying food that may contain them. Environmental activists are ripping up fields where they are being tested experimentally. And companies that design them are selling off their GM subsidiaries, or even themselves, to anyone willing to take on the risk. Yet the chances are that this is just a passing fad. No trial has shown a health risk from a commercially approved GM crop (or, more correctly, a transgenic crop, as all crop plants have been genetically modified by selective breeding since time immemorial). And while the environmental risks, such as cross-pollination with wild species and the promotion of insecticide-resistant strains of pest, look more plausible, they also look no worse than the sorts of environmental havoc wreaked by more traditional sorts of agriculture. THE ECONOMIST JULY 1ST 2000 Choose the correct active voice form for ....fields where they are being tested experimentally

Questão 32
2001Inglês

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) It is a nice irony, given that scientific genetics started with the manipulation of a crop plant, the pea, that the most vehement public opposition to it in recent years has come from those who object to the genetic manipulation of crops. At the moment, so-called genetically modified (GM) crops are in disgrace. Consumers, particularly in Europe, are wary of buying food that may contain them. Environmental activists are ripping up fields where they are being tested experimentally. And companies that design them are selling off their GM subsidiaries, or even themselves, to anyone willing to take on the risk. Yet the chances are that this is just a passing fad. No trial has shown a health risk from a commercially approved GM crop (or, more correctly, a transgenic crop, as all crop plants have been genetically modified by selective breeding since time immemorial). And while the environmental risks, such as cross-pollination with wild species and the promotion of insecticide-resistant strains of pest, look more plausible, they also look no worse than the sorts of environmental havoc wreaked by more traditional sorts of agriculture. THE ECONOMIST JULY 1ST 2000 The passage tells us that GM crops

Questão 32
2001Biologia

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) Em uma pessoa jovem e com boa sade, quando ocorre a sstole (contrao) dos ventrculos, as grandes artrias ( 1 ) e a presso sangnea em seu interior atinge, em mdia, cerca de ( 2 ). Qual das alternativas a seguir contm os termos que substituem corretamente os nmeros 1 e 2 entre parnteses?

Questão 33
2001Biologia

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) Se uma mulher tiver seus ovrios removidos por cirurgia, quais dos seguintes hormnios deixaro de ser produzidos?

Questão 33
2001Inglês

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) It is a nice irony, given that scientific genetics started with the manipulation of a crop plant, the pea, that the most vehement public opposition to it in recent years has come from those who object to the genetic manipulation of crops. At the moment, so-called genetically modified (GM) crops are in disgrace. Consumers, particularly in Europe, are wary of buying food that may contain them. Environmental activists are ripping up fields where they are being tested experimentally. And companies that design them are selling off their GM subsidiaries, or even themselves, to anyone willing to take on the risk. Yet the chances are that this is just a passing fad. No trial has shown a health risk from a commercially approved GM crop (or, more correctly, a transgenic crop, as all crop plants have been genetically modified by selective breeding since time immemorial). And while the environmental risks, such as cross-pollination with wild species and the promotion of insecticide-resistant strains of pest, look more plausible, they also look no worse than the sorts of environmental havoc wreaked by more traditional sorts of agriculture. THE ECONOMIST JULY 1ST 2000 Which of these statements is true according to the passage?

Questão 34
2001Inglês

(FUVEST - 2001 - 1a fase) It is a nice irony, given that scientific genetics started with the manipulation of a crop plant, the pea, that the most vehement public opposition to it in recent years has come from those who object to the genetic manipulation of crops. At the moment, so-called genetically modified (GM) crops are in disgrace. Consumers, particularly in Europe, are wary of buying food that may contain them. Environmental activists are ripping up fields where they are being tested experimentally. And companies that design them are selling off their GM subsidiaries, or even themselves, to anyone willing to take on the risk. Yet the chances are that this is just a passing fad. No trial has shown a health risk from a commercially approved GM crop (or, more correctly, a transgenic crop, as all crop plants have been genetically modified by selective breeding since time immemorial). And while the environmental risks, such as cross-pollination with wild species and the promotion of insecticide-resistant strains of pest, look more plausible, they also look no worse than the sorts of environmental havoc wreaked by more traditional sorts of agriculture. THE ECONOMIST JULY 1ST 2000 According to the passage, the term GM crop

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